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Horton Hears a Who by Dr Seuss

Horton Hears a Who
On the fifteenth of May, in the jungle of Nool,
In the heat of the day, in the cool of the pool,
He was splashing…enjoying the jungle’s great joys…
When Horton the elephant heard a small noise.

So Horton stopped splashing. He looked towards the sound.
“That’s funny,” thought Horton. “There’s no one around.”
Then he heard it again! Just a very faint yelp
As if some tiny person were calling for help.
“I’ll help you,” said Horton. “But who are you? Where?”
He looked and he looked. He could see nothing there
But a small speck of dust blowing past though the air.

“I say!” murmured Horton. “I’ve never heard tell
Of a small speck of dust that is able to yell.
So you know what I think?…Why, I think that there must
Be someone on top of that small speck of dust!
Some sort of a creature of very small size,
too small to be seen by an elephant’s eyes…

“…some poor little person who’s shaking with fear
That he’ll blow in the pool! He has no way to steer!
I’ll just have to save him. Because, after all,
A person’s a person, no matter how small.”

So, gently, and using the greatest of care,
The elephant stretched his great trunk through the air,
And he lifted the dust speck and carried it over
And placed it down, safe, on a very soft clover.

“Humpf!” humpfed a voice. Twas a sour Kangaroo.
And the young kangaroo in he pouch said “Humpf!” too
“Why, that speck is as small as the head of a pin.
A person on that?…why, there never has been!”

“Believe me,” said Horton. “I tell you sincerely,
My ears are quite keen and I heard him quite clearly.
I know there’s a person down there. And, what’s more,
Quite likely there’s two. Even three. Even four.
Quite likely…

“…a family, for all that we know!
A family with children just starting to grow.
So, please,” Horton said, “as a favour to me,
Try not to disturb them. Just let them be.”

“I think you’re a fool!” laughed the sour kangaroo
And the young kangaroo in her pouch said, “Me, too!
You’re the biggest blame fool in the jungle of Nool!”
And the kangaroos plunged in the cool of the pool.
“What terrible splashing!” the elephant frowned.
“I can’t let my very small persons get drowned!
I’ve got to protect them. I’m bigger than they.”
So he plucked up the clover and hustled away.

Through the high jungle tree tops, the news quickly spread:
“He talks to a dust speck! He’s out of his head!
Just look at him walk with that speck on the flower!”
And Horton walked, worrying, almost an hour.
“Should I put this speck down?…” Horton though with alarm.
“If I do, these small persons may come to great harm.
I can’t put it down. And I won’t! After all
A person’s a person. No matter how small.”

Then Horton stopped walking.
The speck-voice was talking!
The voice was so faint he could just barely hear it.
“Speak up, please,” Said Horton. He put his ear near it.
“My friend,” came the voice, “you’re a very fine friend.
You’ve helped all us folks on this dust speck no end.
You’ve saved all our houses, our ceilings and floors.
You’ve saved all our churches and grocery stores.”

“You mean…” Horton gasped, “you have buildings there, too?”
“Oh, yes,” piped the voice. “We most certainly do…
“I know,” called the voice, “I’m too small to be seen
But I’m Mayor of a town that is friendly and clean.
Our buildings, to you, would seem terribly small
But to us, who aren’t big, they are wonderfully tall.
My town is called Who-ville, for I am a Who
And we Whos are all thankful and greatful to you”

And Horton called back to the Mayor of the town,
“You’re safe now. Don’t worry. I won’t let you down.”

But, Just as he spoke to the Mayor of the speck,
Three big jungle monkeys climbed up Horton’s neck!
The Wickersham Brothers came shouting, “What rot!
This elephants talking to Whos who are not!
There aren’t any Whos! And they don’t have a Mayor!
And we’re going to stop all this nonsense! So there!”

They snatched Horton’s clover! They carried it off
To a black-bottomed eagle named Valad Vlad-I-koff,
A mighty strong eagle, of very swift wing,
And they said, “Will you kindly get rid of this thing?”
And, before the poor elephant could even speak,
That eagle flew off with the flower in his beak.

All that late afternoon and far into the night
That black-bottomed bird flapped his wings in fast flight,
While Horton chased after, with groans, over stones
That tattered his toenails and battered his bones,
And begged, “Please don’t harm all my little folks, who
Have as much right to live as us bigger folk do!”

But far, far beyond him, that eagle kept flapping
And over his shoulder called back, “Quit your yapping.
I’ll fly the night through. I’m a bird. I don’t mind it.
And I’ll hide this, tomorrow, where you’ll never find it!”

And at 6:56 the next morning he did it.
It sure was a terrible place that he hid it.
He let that small clover drop somewhere inside
Of a great patch of clovers a hundred miles wide!
“Find THAT!” sneered the bird. “But I think you will fail.”
And he left
With a flip
Of his black-bottomed tail.

“I’ll find it!” cried Horton. “I’ll find it or bust!
I SHALL find my friends on my small speck of dust!”
And clover, by clover, by clover with care
He picked up and searched the, and called, “Are you there?”
But clover, by clover, by clover he found
That the one that he sought for was just not around.
And by noon poor old Horton, more dead than alive,
Had picked, searched, and piled up, nine thousand and five.

Then, on through the afternoon, hour after hour…
Till he found them at last! On the three millionth flower!
“My friends!” cried the elephant. “Tell me! Do tell!
Are you safe? Are you sound? Are you whole? Are you well?”

From down on the speck came the voice of the Mayor:
“We’ve really had trouble! Much more than our share.
When that black-bottomed birdie let go and we dropped,
We landed so hard that our clocks have all stopped.
Our tea pots are broken. Our rocking-chairs are smashed.
And our bicycle tires all blew up when we crashed.
So, Horton, Please!” pleaded that voice of the Mayor’s,
“Will you stick by us Whos while we’re making repairs?”

“Of course,” Horton answered. “Of course I will stick.
I’ll stick by you small folks though thin and though thick!”

“Humpf!” humpfed a voice!
“For almost two days you’ve run wild and insisted
On chatting with persons who’ve never existed.
Such carryings-on in our peaceable jungle!
We’ve had quite enough of your bellowing bungle!
And I’m here to state,” snapped the big kangaroo,
“That your silly nonsensical game is all through!”
And the young kangaroo in her pouch said, “Me, too!”

“With the help of the Wickersham Brothers and dozens
Of Wickersham Uncles and Wickershams Cousins
And Wickersham In-Laws, whose help I’ve engaged,
You’re going to be roped! And you’re going to be caged!
And, as for your dust speck…hah!
That we shall boil
In a hot steaming kettle of Beezle-Nut Oil!”
“Boil it?…” gasped Horton!
“Oh, that you can’t do!
It’s all full of persons!
They’ll prove it to you!”

“Mr. Mayor! Mr. Mayor!” Horton called. “Mr. Mayor!
You’ve got to prove that you really are there!
So call a big meeting. Get everyone out.
Make every Who holler! Make every Who shout!
Make every Who scream! If you don’t, every Who
Is going to end up in a Beezle-Nut stew!”

And, down on the dust speck, the scared little Mayor
Quick called a big meeting in Who-ville Town Square.
And his people cried loudly. They cried out in fear:
“We are here! We are here! We are here!”

The elephant smiled: “That was clear as a bell.
You Kangaroos surely heard that very well.”
“All I heard,” snapped the big kangaroo, “Was the breeze,
And the faint sound of wind through the far-distant trees.
I heard no small voices. And you didn’t either.”
And the you kangaroo in her pouch said, “Me, neither.”

“Grab him!” they shouted. “And cage the big dope!
Lasso his stomach with ten miles of rope!
Tie the knots tight so he’ll never shake lose!
Then dunk that dumb speck in the Beezle-Nut juice!”



Horton fought back with great vigor and vim
But the Wickersham gang was too many for him.
They beat him! They mauled him! They started to haul
Him into his cage! But he managed to call
To the Mayor: “Don’t give up! I believe in you all
A person’s a person, no matter how small!
And you very small persons will not have to die
If you make yourselves heard! So come on, now, and TRY!”

The Mayor grabbed a tom-tom. He started to smack it.
And, all over Who-ville, they whooped up a racked.
They rattled tie kettles! They beat on brass pans,
On garbage pail tops and old cranberry cans!
They blew on bazooka and blasted great toots
On clarinets, oom-pahs and boom-pahs and flutes!

Great gusts of loud racket rang high through the air.
They rattled and shook the whole sky! And the Mayor
Called up through the howling mad hullabaloo:
“Hey Horton! Hows this? Is our sound coming through?”

And Horton called back, “I can hear you just fine.
But the kangaroos’ ears aren’t as strong, quite, as mine.
They don’t hear a thing! Are you sure all you boys
Are doing their best? Are they ALL making noise?
Are you sure every Who down in Who-ville is working?
Quick! Look through your town! Is there anyone shirking?”

Through the town rushed the Mayor, From the east to the west.
But everyone seemed to be doing his best.
Everyone seemed to be yapping or yipping!
Everyone seemed to be beeping or bipping!
But it wasn’t enough, all this ruckus and roar!
He HAD to find someone to help him make more.
He raced through each building! He searched floor-to-floor!

And, just as he felt he was getting nowhere,
And almost about to give up in despair,
He suddenly burst through a door and that Mayor
Discovered one shirker! Quite hidden away
In the Fairfax Apartments (Apartment 12-J)
A very small, very small shirker named Jo-Jo
was standing, just standing, and bouncing a Yo-Yo!
Not making a sound! Not a yipp! Not a chirp!
And the Mayor rushed inside and he grabbed the young twerp!

And he climbed with the lad up the Eiffelberg Tower.
“This,” cried the Mayor, “is your towns darkest hour!
The time for all Whos who have blood that is red
To come to the aid of their country!” he said.
“We’ve GOT to make noises in greater amounts!
So, open your mouth, lad! For every voice counts!”

Thus he spoke as he climbed. When they got to the top,
The lad cleared his throat and he shouted out, “YOPP!”

And that Yopp…
That one small, extra Yopp put it over!
Finally, at last! From that speck on that clover
Their voices were heard! They rang out clear and clean.
And the elephant smiled. “Do you see what I mean?…
They’ve proved they ARE persons, no matter how small.
And their whole world was saved by the smallest of All!”

“How true! Yes, how true,” said the big kangaroo.
“And, from now on, you know what I’m planning to do?…
From now on, I’m going to protect them with you!”
And the young kangaroo in her pouch said…
“…ME, TOO!”
“From the sun in the summer. From rain when it’s fall-ish,
I’m going to protect them. No matter how small-ish!”

Video: Horton Hears a Who by Dr Seuss


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Dr seuss Tee Shirts

Here you will find tees for the little people. Why should the grown ups get all the best clothes? From year dot, we have baby tees for your little rocker, punker, or for kids with attitude. You can find the newest T-shirts to our Kids tees range below, as well as a handy drop down menu which lists all the bands currently available or even view our entire range alphabetically, as well as the top rated Dr seuss Tee Shirts by you.If there's a Kids T-shirt available,will have it! Ages 6 Months - 12 Years.

Dr seuss Tee Shirts

Dr. Seuss Horton Hears A Who Person is a Person White Juniors T-shirt Tee
* cotton
* 50% cotton, 50% polyester
* Dr. Seuss
* Fitted
Dr. Seuss white t-shirt. Features the lovable elephant, Horton from Horton Hears a Who and reads, "A person is a person no matter how small." 50% cotton, 50% polyester. Fitted. Officially licensed.

Dr seuss-Tee Shirts


Bumkins Dr. Seuss Vintage Ringer Tee, 2 Pack, One Fish
* One fish tee 18 months
* Hortona aqua tee 18 months
* 100% cotton
* Tagless for added comfort

 Tee Shirts of Dr Seuss


Bumkins Dr. Seuss Vintage Ringer Tee, 2 Pack, Hop on Top
* Hop on pop tee 18 moths
* Green eggs and ham tee 18 months
* 100% cotton
* Tagless for added comfort


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If I Ran The Zoo by Dr.Seuss

If I Ran The Zoo by Dr.Seuss

And then, just to show them, I’ll sail to Ka-Troo And Bring Back an IT-KUTCH a PREEP and a PROO a NERKLE a NERD and a SEERSUCKER, too”

“It’s a pretty good zoo,” said young Gerald McGrew, “and the fellow who runs it seems proud of it, too.”

But if Gerald ran the zoo, the New Zoo, McGrew Zoo, he’d see to making a change or two: “So I’d open each cage. I’d unlock every pen, let the animals go, and start over again.”

And that’s just what Gerald imagines, as he travels the world in this playfully collecting all sorts of beasts “that you don’t see every day.” From the mountains of Zomba-ma-Tant to the blistering sands of the Desert of Zind,

Gerald hunts down every animal imaginable (“I’ll catch ‘em in countries no one can spell, like the country of Motta-fa-Potta-fa-Pell”). Whether it’s a scraggle-foot Mulligatawny or a wild-haired Iota (from “the far western part of south-east North Dakota”),

Gerald amazes the world with his new and improved zoo: “This Zoo Keeper, New Keeper’s simply astounding! He travels so far that you think he would drop! When do you suppose this young fellow will stop?”

But Gerald’s weird and wonderful globe-trotting safari doesn’t end a moment too soon: “young McGrew’s made his mark. He’s built a zoo better than Noah’s whole Ark!”.

“I’ll hunt in the mountains of Zomba-ma-Tant/ With helpers who all wear their eyes at a slant,

Video: If I Ran The Zoo


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The lorax by Dr.Seuss


dr.seuss the lorax

At the far end of town, where the Grickle-grass grows
and the wind smells slow-and-sour when it blows
and no birds ever sing excepting old crows...
is the Street of the Lifted Lorax.

And deep in the Grickle-grass, some people say,
if you look deep enough you can still see, today,
where the Lorax once stood, just as long as it could
before somebody lifted the Lorax away.

What WAS the Lorax? And why was it there?
And why was it lifted and taken somewhere
from the far end of town where the Grickle-grass grows?
The old Once-ler still lives here.
Ask him. HE knows.

You wont see the Once-ler. Dont knock at his door.
He stays in his Lerkim on top of his store.
He lurks in his Lerkim, cold under the roof,
where he makes his own clothes
out of miff-muffered moof.

And on special dank midnights in August,
he peeks out of the shutters
and sometimes he speaks
and tells how the Lorax was lifted away.

He'll tell you, perhaps...
if you're willing to pay.

On the end of a rope he lets down a tin pail
and you have to toss in fifteen cents and a nail
and the shell of a great-great-great
grandfather snail.

He pulls up the pail,
makes a most careful count
to see if you've paid him the proper amount.

Then he hides what you pay him
away in his Snuvv,
his secret strange hole in his gruvvulous glove.

Then he grunts, "I will call you by Whisper-ma-Phone,
for the secrets I tell are for your ears alone."

"SLUPP!"
Down slupps the Whisper-ma-Phone to your ear
and the Once-ler's whispers are not very clear,
since they have to come down
through a snergelly hose,
and he sounds as if he had
smallish bees up his nose.

"Now I'll tell you," he says,
with his teeth sounding gray,
"how the Lorax got lifted and taken away...
It all started back...
such a long, long time back...


Way back in the days when the grass was still green
and the pond was still wet
and the clouds were still clean
and the song of the Swomee-Swans rand out into space...
one morning, I came to this glorious place.
And I first saw the trees!
The Truffula Trees!
The bright-colored tufts of the Truffula trees!
Mile after mile in the fresh morning breeze.

And, under the trees, I saw Brown Bar-ba-loots
frisking about in their Bar-ba-loot suits
as they played in the shade and ate Truffula Fruits.

From the rippulous pond
came the comfortable sound
of the Humming-Fish humming
while splashing around.

But those TREES!
Those TREES!
THOSE TRUFFULA TREES!
All my life I've been searching
for trees such as these.
The touch of their tufts was much softer than silk
And they had the sweet smell Of fresh butterfly milk.

I felt a great leaping
of joy in my heart.
I knew just what I'd do!
I unloaded my cart.

In no time at all, I had built a small shop.
Then I chopped down a Truffula Tree with one chop.
And with great skillful skill and with great speedy speed,
I took the soft tuft. And I knitted a Thneed!

The instant I'd finished, I heard a GA-ZUMP!
I looked.
I saw something pop out of the stump
of the tree I'd chopped down.
It was sort of a man.
Describe him?...That's hard.
I don't know if I can.

He was shortish. And oldish.
And brownish. And mossy.
And he spoke with a voice that was sharpish and bossy.

"Mister!" he said with a sawdusty sneeze,
"I am the Lorax. I speak for the trees.
I speak for the trees, for the trees have no tongues.
And I'm asking you, sir, at the top of my lungs"--
he was very upset as he shouted and puffed--
"What's that THING you've made out of my Truffula tuft?"

"Look, Lorax," I said. "There's no call for alarm.
I chopped just one tree. I am doing no harm.
I'm being quite useful. This thing is a Thneed.
A Thneed's a Fine-Something-That-All-People-Need!
It's a shirt. It's a sock. It's a glove. It's a hat.
But it has OTHER uses. Yes, far beyond that.
You can use it for carpets. For pillows! For sheets!
Or curtains! Or covers for bicycle seats!"

The Lorax said,
"Sir! You are crazy with greed.
There is no one on earth
who would buy that fool Thneed!"

But the very next minute I proved he was wrong.
For, just at that minute, a chap came along,
and he thought that the Thneed I had knitted was great.
He happily bought it for three ninEty-eight

I laughed at the Lorax, "You poor stupid guy!
You never can tell what some people will buy."

"I repeat," cried the Lorax,
"I speak for the trees!"

"I'm busy," I told him.
"Shut up, if you please."

I rushed 'cross the room, and in no time at all,
built a radio-phone. I put in a quick call.

I called all my brothers and uncles and aunts
and I said, "Listen here! Here's a wonderful chance
for the whole Once-ler Family to get mighty rich!
Get over here fast! Take the road to North Nitch.
Turn left at Weehawken.
Sharp right at South Stitch."

And, in no time at all, in the factory i built,
the whole Once-ler Family was working full tilt.
We were all knitting Thneeds just as busy as bees,
to the sound of the chopping of Truffula Trees.

Then..
Oh! Baby! Oh!
How my business did grow!
Now, chopping one tree
at a time was too slow.

So I quickly invented my Super-Axe-Hacker
which whacked off four Tuffula Trees at one smacker.
We were making Thneeds
four times as fast as before!
And that Lorax?...
HE didn't show up anymore.

But the next week
he knocked on my new office door.

He snapped, "I'm the Lorax who speaks for the trees
which you seem to be chopping as fast as you please.
But I'm ALSO in charge of the Brown Bar-ba-loots
who played in the shade in their Bar-ba-loot suits
and happily lived, eating Truffula Friuts.

"NOW...thanks to your hacking my trees to the ground,
there's not enough Truffula Fruit to go 'round.
And my poor Bar-ba-loots are all getting the crummies
because they have gas, and no food, in their tummies!

"They loved living here. But I can't let them stay.
They'll have to find food. And I hope that they may.
Good luck, boys," he cried. And he sent them away.

I, the Once-ler, felt sad
as I watched them all go.
BUT...
business is business
And business must grow
regardless of crummies in tummies, you know.

I meant no harm.
I most truly did not.
But I had to grow bigger. So bigger I got.

I biggered my factory. I biggered my roads.
I biggered my wagons.
I biggered the loads of the Theends I shipped out.
I was shipping them forth to the South! To the East!
To the West! To the North!
I went right on biggering...selling more Thneeds.
And I biggered my money, which everyone needs.

Then AGAIN he came back!
I was fixing some pipes
when that old-nuicence Lorax came back
with MORE gripes.

"I am the Lorax," he coughed and he whiffed.
He sneezed and he snuffled. He snarggled. He sniffed.
"Once-ler!" he cried with a cruffulous croak.
"Once-ler! You're making a smogulous smoke!
My poor Swomee-Swans...why, they can't sing a note!
No one can sing who has smog in his throat.

"And so," said the Lorax,
"--please pardon my cough--
they cannot live here.
So I'm sending them off.

"Where will they go now?... I dont hopefully know.
They may have to fly for a month...or a year...
To escape from the smog you've smogged-up around here.

"What's more," snapped the Lorax. (His dander was up.)
"Let me say a few words about Gluppity-Glupp.
Your machinery chugs on, day and night without stop
making Gluppity-Glupp. Also Schloppity-Schlopp.
And what do you do with this leftover goo?
I'll show you, you dirty old Once-ler man, you!

You're Glumping the pond where the Humming-Fish hummed!
No more can they hum, for their gills are all gummed.
So, I'm sending them off. Oh, thier future is dreary.
They'll walk on their fins and get woefully weary
in search of some water that isn't so smeary."

And then I got mad.
I got terribly mad.
I yelled at the Lorax, "Now listen here, Dad!
All you do is yap-yap and say 'Bad! Bad! Bad! Bad!"
Well, I have my rights, sir, and I;m telling YOU
I intend to go on doing just what I do!
And, for your information, you Lorax, I'm figgering
on biggering,
and Biggering
and BIGGERING
and BIGGERING,
turning MORE Truffula Trees into Thneeds
which everyone, EVERYONE, EVERYONE needs!"


And at that very moment, we heard a loud whack!
From outside in the fields came a sickening smack
of an axe on a tree. Then we heard the tree fall.
The very last Tuffula Tree of them all!

No more trees. No more Thneeds. No more work to be done.
So, in no time, my uncles and aunts, every one,
all waved good-bye. They jumped into my cars
and drove away under the smoke (or smog)-smuggered stars.

Now all that was left 'neath the bad-smelling sky
was my big empty factory...
the Lorax...
and I.

The Lorax said nothing. Just gave me a glance...
just gave me a very sad, sad backward glance...
as he lifted himself by the seat of his pants.

And I'll never forget the grim look on his face
when he heisted himself and took leave of this place,
through a hole in the smog, without leaving a trace.

And all that the Lorax left here in this mess
was a smaLl pile of rocks, with one word... "UNLESS."
Whatever THAT meant, well, I couldn't guess.

That was long, long ago.
But each day since that day
I've sat here and worried and worried away.
Through the years, while my buildings have fallen apart,
I've worried about it with all of my heart.

"But NOW," says the Once-ler,
"Now that YOU'RE here,
the word of the Lorax seems perfectly clear.

UNLESS someone like you
cares a whole awful lot,
nothing is going to get better.
It's not.

"SO...
Catch!" calls the Once-ler.
He lets something fall.
"Its a Truffula Seed.
It's the last one of all!

You're in charge of the last of the Truffula Seeds.
And Truffula Trees are what everyone needs.
Plant a new Truffula. Treat it with care.
Give it clean water. And feed it fresh air.
Grow a forest. Protect it from axes that hack.
Then the Lorax and all of his friends may come back."

Video: The lorax by Dr.Seuss


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Thing 1 and thing 2 - Dr Seuss

Dr. Suess tee shirts for "Thing 1" and "Thing 2" in your family! They're great "things" to have! Made of 100% heavyweight cotton.Available in Sizes: 6M, 12M, 18M, 2T. A Thing 1 and a Thing 2, one for each of your twins. A portion of the proceeds from sales of these items will benefit Twinstuff Outreach, a non-profit organization dedicated to helping twins and higher-order multiples and their families.






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Go Dog Go of Dr Seuss

go dog go - dr seuss
Coming with and showcasing dogs of different shapes, sizes, and colors, this is my number one and all time favorite early readers’ and children’s book. Big dog, little dog, blue dog, red dog – it’s easy to see why my now 2 year old son’s first word was dog. Back when my teens were still on their toddler years, we, along with my little one (who is currently 5 months old) will sit and read through most of the book. There are even times when we finish this book in one sitting especially if the whole gang is up to it.

I don’t want to be redundant BUT this is a great first reader book since the words used are very common. Along with that, it also comes with illustrations that are of great help when one is reading – one big dog going in (you would see one of our furry friends opening the door) and two little dogs going out. Among the different scenarios found in the book, what I love most is when the three dogs are holding a party at the boat during night time. Another unforgettable part is when one dog stays up at night, making sure everyone is safe, when all of the other dogs are sound asleep. Really cute!

Bottom line, every child should have Go Dog Go! by P.D. Eastman in their library. Reading should start at a very young age, and this is the book to go for. I’m giving this great first readers’ book my highest recommendation!
go dog go dr seuss - book

go dog go by dr seuss










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Top Clever and Fun Dr Seuss Shirts & T-Shirts for Kids

Dr Seuss Shirts are a basic for every wardrobe, and kids are crazy over them. Dr Seuss-Shirts are the quintessential layering piece and the go-to top for warm weather. But, the best thing about the Dr Seuss-Shirts is that it can be used as a canvas to display works of graphic art, funny words and sayings, or just about anything. Be prepared to see lots of clever, funny and inspiring kids' Dr Seuss-Shirts. Hope you love Dr. Seuss as much as we do and enjoy our Dr Seuss Store filled with unique Seuss Products.

1. Color Theory Tees by Nina and Tom Family Fashion
2. Crib Rock Couture's Concert Tees
3. Speak Clothing American Sign Language Tees
4. Kingsley Pots & Pans Band Tee
5. Knockout Tot by Glamajama
6. I Love Trains - Long Sleeve Thermal T
7. I Love Daddy/Mommy Raglan Tees
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Dr Seuss - Grinch Face T-Shirt
This "grinch" green cotton t-shirt features one of the most famous Dr. Seuss characters of all time - The Grinch. His face is printed in fuzzy flocking along with bright yellow eyes. Oh, he's a mean one - that Grinch!

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Hooray for Diffendoofer Day - Dr Seuss

Hooray for Diffendoofer Day is based on an idea by Dr. Seuss(March 4, 1904-September 24,1991). He passed before completing the book. Jack Prelutsky completed the text. Lane Smith illustrated the book.

Hooray for Diffendoofer Day is a celebration at the school, Diffendoofer. The school does not conform with the program of teaching children only facts to pass standardized tests. There is a popular view that the reason for schools, is to produce students who have high scores on national tests.

Diffendoofer school believes differently on the subject. It takes the creative approach. The children are taught to think for themselves. The school has unusual teachers and curriculum. One teacher teaches listening. Another teacher teaches smelling. Laughing is another lesson. Yelling is a subject.

One day, the Diffendoofer students are told there is an upcoming standardized test. The students are nervous. If the students fail the test, the Board of Education will demolish the school. Failure means school in dreary Flobberton where imagination is not allowed.

Test day arrives. The students take the test. They ace the test. Their success is due to the fact the students can think and reason for themselves. Teachers are not daily drilling test answers into their heads.

Hooray for Diffendoofer Day is a commentary on educational programs that measures children learning by test score results and nothing else. Dr. Suess shares his theories on standards-based programs with his readers. There is a special section at the end of the book with his notes.

A creative child who can think for himself is our future inventor or protector of our liberties. A child who learns only what is drummed into their head is likely to believe anything told him by those in power.

Problems can be solved by different means. Remember the saying, “There is more than one way to skin a cat.”

Hooray for Diffendoofer Day! has rhyming verse. Jack Prelutsky’s poetry captures Dr. Suess’ lively banner. There is a blend of Lane Smith and Dr. Seuss’ characters on each page. The vocabulary is advance for the average picture book reader to read on their own. Therefore, the book is for ages’ seven-years-old and up. This story book like Dr. Seuss(Theodor Suess Geisel)’s, Oh, the Places You’ll Go, is a good book for both young people and adults. Hooray for Diffendoofer Day! is one of Dr. Seuss political books.


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Yertle the Turtle and other Stories

Yertle the Turtle and other Stories are by the writer and illustrator Dr. Seuss(March 4, 1904-September 24, 1991). Random House published the collection of fables in 1950. Yertle the Turtle, Gertrude McFuzz and the Big Brag are the three stories in the collection. The classic Dr Seuss picture book is for kids between four and eight-years-old(ages 4-8).

A turtle, Yertle, wants to be the king of the pond. He asks the other turtles to pile one on top of another. They comply with Yertle’s request. He becomes the top turtle on the pile. He claims to rule all he can see. Unfortunately, Yertle builds his kingdom on the backs’ of the other turtles. King Yertle ignores the starving turtles’ loud cries for food. The turtles revolt. Yertle’s kingdom falls as so does he, now he is the king of the pond’s muck. What’s the big deal of being the big turtle of the scrap heap? His coveting of power is his downfall.

Gertrude McFuzz is a good-looking bird with a plain tail. Gertrude covets Lolla-Lee-Lou beautiful tail. Lolla-Lee-Lou’s tail is full-feathered. Gertrude, which has only one tail feather, gets her wish. However, she discovers she cannot walk, fly or run. What is a bird who cannot do these things? Her coveting of beauty is her downfall.

The Big Brag is between a bear and rabbit. They each brag to be the best beast in the world. Why? One animal brags as having the best ears for hearing. The other forest animal claims he has the best nose for smelling. A worm happens along and stops to listen to their debate. He decides the bear and rabbit are the biggest fools. The worm returns to work shaking his head at their absurdity. Rabbit and bear’s bragging draws laughter from the worm and other animals. Their coveting of superiority brings jeers from others.

Dr. Seuss’s collection of fables is as stories of old. Like Aesop’s Fables, Dr. Seuss’s fables are a combination of humor and wisdom. His moral stories help humans lead a better life. Parents and teachers can share the story book with toddlers, preschool and elementary kids. Discuss the fables and their message with children. Use Yertle the Turtle and other Stories to introduce young people to fables.


List of Dr. Seuss Classic Books
And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, 1937
Bartholomew and the Oobleck, 1949
The Butter Battle Book, 1984
Cat in the Hat, 1957
Cat in the Hat Comes Back, 1958
Cat's Quizzer, The
Daisy-Head Mayzie
Did I Ever Tell You How Lucky You Are? 1973
Dr. Seuss ABC, 1963
Dr. Seuss Sleep Book, 1962
The Five Hundred Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins, 1938
The Foot Book, 1968
Fox in Socks, 1965
Great Day for Up! 1974
Green Eggs and Ham, 1960
Happy Birthday to You, 1959
Hop on Pop, 1963
Horton Hatches the Egg, 1940
Horton Hears a Who, 1954
How the Grinch Stole Christmas, 1957
Hunches in Bunches, 1982
I Am Not Going to Get up Today!, 1987
I Can Draw It Myself: By Me, Myself with a Little Help from My Friend Dr. Seuss, 1970
I Can Lick Thirty Tigers Today & Other Stories, 1969
I Can Read with My Eyes Shut!, 1978
I Had Trouble in Getting to Solla Sollew, 1992
If I Ran the Circus, 1956
If I Ran the Zoo, 1950
King's Stilts, 1939
The Lorax, 1971
McElligot's Pool, 1947
Marvin K. Mooney, Will You Please Go Now, 1972
Mister Brown Can Moo, Can You, 1970
My Book About Me, 1969
Oh, Say Can You Say?, 1979
Oh, the Places You'll Go!, 1990
Oh! The Thinks You Can Think!, 1975
On Beyond Zebra, 1955
One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish, 1960
Scrambled Eggs Super!, 1953
The Seven Lady Godivas, 1987
Shape Of Me And Other Stuff, 1973
Sneetches And Other Stories, 1969
There's a Wocket in My Pocket! 1974
Thidwick, the Big-Hearted Moose, 1948
Wet Pet, Dry Pet, Your Pet, My Pet
Yertle the Turtle & Other Stories, 1958
You're Only Old Once



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Wet Pet Dry Pet Your Pet My Pet

Wet Pet, Dry Pet, Your Pet, My Pet is a board book in the Dr. Seuss Nursery Books Collection. A fun book for children learning opposites. It is based on Dr. Seuss’ One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish. The interactive board book has fourteen pages.

Babies and toddlers love Wet Pet, Dry Pet, Your Pet, My Pet. That is because they can pet and play with Dr. Seuss’ whimsical creatures. The zany pets come in all colors. Kids can stroke them. Fur and feathers cover some pets giving children a tactile experience. Toddlers can lift flaps, pull tabs and toss rings.

The rhythm of the rhyming verse will capture infants and toddlers’ attention. Their silly rhymes are fun and short. Books that are fun make it easy for kids to learn opposites. The rhyming activities encourage to develop language skills. Take time and allow the infants and toddlers to learn the beginning and ending sounds of the words.

Wet Pet, Dry Pet, Your Pet, My Pet board book withstands the abuse of children. The thick pages are easy for small hands to turn the pages. Beware kids may place objects in their mouth, so monitor them closely.

Infants and toddlers are developing their motor skills. Have small children clap to the rhythm of the rhyming verse to develop gross motor skills. They love to march to the beat of the verse, too. The poems are easy to repeat. They will chant the words, clap and march with smiles of delight. Wet Pet, Dry Pet, Your Pet, My Pet is part of the Dr. Seuss Nursery Collection. Click for the online list.



List of Dr. Seuss Classic Books
And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, 1937
Bartholomew and the Oobleck, 1949
The Butter Battle Book, 1984
Cat in the Hat, 1957
Cat in the Hat Comes Back, 1958
Cat's Quizzer, The
Daisy-Head Mayzie
Did I Ever Tell You How Lucky You Are? 1973
Dr. Seuss ABC, 1963
Dr. Seuss Sleep Book, 1962
The Five Hundred Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins, 1938
The Foot Book, 1968
Fox in Socks, 1965
Great Day for Up! 1974
Green Eggs and Ham, 1960
Happy Birthday to You, 1959
Hop on Pop, 1963
Horton Hatches the Egg, 1940
Horton Hears a Who, 1954
How the Grinch Stole Christmas, 1957
Hunches in Bunches, 1982
I Am Not Going to Get up Today!, 1987
I Can Draw It Myself: By Me, Myself with a Little Help from My Friend Dr. Seuss, 1970
I Can Lick Thirty Tigers Today & Other Stories, 1969
I Can Read with My Eyes Shut!, 1978
I Had Trouble in Getting to Solla Sollew, 1992
If I Ran the Circus, 1956
If I Ran the Zoo, 1950
King's Stilts, 1939
The Lorax, 1971
McElligot's Pool, 1947
Marvin K. Mooney, Will You Please Go Now, 1972
Mister Brown Can Moo, Can You, 1970
My Book About Me, 1969
Oh, Say Can You Say?, 1979
Oh, the Places You'll Go!, 1990
Oh! The Thinks You Can Think!, 1975
On Beyond Zebra, 1955
One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish, 1960
Scrambled Eggs Super!, 1953
The Seven Lady Godivas, 1987
Shape Of Me And Other Stuff, 1973
Sneetches And Other Stories, 1969
There's a Wocket in My Pocket! 1974
Thidwick, the Big-Hearted Moose, 1948
Wet Pet, Dry Pet, Your Pet, My Pet
Yertle the Turtle & Other Stories, 1958
You're Only Old Once



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Thidwick, The Big-Hearted Moose

Thidwick, The Big-Hearted Moose is by Dr. Seuss. The picture book has fifty-six pages. Target age groups are children between four and eight-years-old. Due to the long text and difficult rhyming words Thidwick is a Dr. Seuss Read Aloud book.

Thidwick is a moose who lives on Lake Winna-Bango. He lives with a large herd on an island. The moose is a male with large antlers. One day, an insect asks the Big-Hearted Moose may he ride on the antlers. Thidwick responses with a yes. Soon, his antlers are the home to a hoard of ungrateful guests. The unkind guests soon place Thidwick’s life in jeopardy. How do the responsible, Thidwick the Big-Hearted Moose gets out of the dangerous situation?

Dr. Seuss' book his wit and rhyme in a humourous book about a painful situation. Children view the animals(guests) one-by-one take advantage of their host’s hospitality. Dr. Seuss’s drawings of each additional guest add humor to the tale. Kids are drawn to the rhyming verse just as the animals are drawn to the antlers.

Children learn an important life lesson: not to take advantage of their host’s hospitality and have respect for other’s possessions. At the age of four and older, kids visit people’s homes. They must learn to treat the homes with respect or lose a good thing.

Also, Thidwick, The Big-Hearted Moose teaches kids about the natural world. They learn a moose migrates during the seasons to find food. Also, they learn that a moose naturally loose their antlers every year.



List of Dr. Seuss Classic Books
And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, 1937
Bartholomew and the Oobleck, 1949
The Butter Battle Book, 1984
Cat in the Hat, 1957
Cat in the Hat Comes Back, 1958
Cat's Quizzer, The
Daisy-Head Mayzie
Did I Ever Tell You How Lucky You Are? 1973
Dr. Seuss ABC, 1963
Dr. Seuss Sleep Book, 1962
The Five Hundred Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins, 1938
The Foot Book, 1968
Fox in Socks, 1965
Great Day for Up! 1974
Green Eggs and Ham, 1960
Happy Birthday to You, 1959
Hop on Pop, 1963
Horton Hatches the Egg, 1940
Horton Hears a Who, 1954
How the Grinch Stole Christmas, 1957
Hunches in Bunches, 1982
I Am Not Going to Get up Today!, 1987
I Can Draw It Myself: By Me, Myself with a Little Help from My Friend Dr. Seuss, 1970
I Can Lick Thirty Tigers Today & Other Stories, 1969
I Can Read with My Eyes Shut!, 1978
I Had Trouble in Getting to Solla Sollew, 1992
If I Ran the Circus, 1956
If I Ran the Zoo, 1950
King's Stilts, 1939
The Lorax, 1971
McElligot's Pool, 1947
Marvin K. Mooney, Will You Please Go Now, 1972
Mister Brown Can Moo, Can You, 1970
My Book About Me, 1969
Oh, Say Can You Say?, 1979
Oh, the Places You'll Go!, 1990
Oh! The Thinks You Can Think!, 1975
On Beyond Zebra, 1955
One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish, 1960
Scrambled Eggs Super!, 1953
The Seven Lady Godivas, 1987
Shape Of Me And Other Stuff, 1973
Sneetches And Other Stories, 1969
There's a Wocket in My Pocket! 1974
Thidwick, the Big-Hearted Moose, 1948
Wet Pet, Dry Pet, Your Pet, My Pet
Yertle the Turtle & Other Stories, 1958
You're Only Old Once



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Scrambled Eggs Super

Dr. Seuss(March 4, 1904 - September 24, 1991) is the author of Scrambled Eggs Super! He wrote the Classic Dr. Seuss adventure book in 1953. Zany rhymes and whimsical characters are as enjoyable today as then. The child’s picture book is for kids between four and eight-years-old. However, it is a favorite with parents, teachers and other adults.

A young boy, Peter T. Hooper, recounts his Scrambled Eggs Super meal to a friend. Now, this young chef does not use ordinary hen eggs, but exotic ones. This is where the fun begins. He and friends travel the planet for eggs. There are eggs of the Kweet, Kwigger, Tizzy, Grickily Gractus, Moth-Watching Sneth and other unusual birds to collect and cook.

Dr. Seuss’ illustrations of the birds delight infants, toddlers, preschool and elementary kids. Scrambled Eggs Super works well as a bedtime or circle book. The 8" X 11 ½" picture book is easy for a group of children to view. Older kids know the base words, but need help with the “Dr. Seuss words.” Younger children love to hear the rhyming verse.

Peter T. Hooper is unlike the No-Name character in Green Eggs and Ham. He is an adventurous soul and willing to try new culinary delights. Hopefully, picky eaters will try new foods after hearing Scrambled Eggs Super! A note of warning, Peter T. Hooper fixes his scrambled egg masterpiece while his mother is away from home. Remind youngsters to use the stove and oven under adult supervision.

Children need to have a regular routine. A set bedtime and place to sleep are part of the daily routine. Read a bedtime story as part of the nightly ritual. Read quiet, soothing books to children in their warm, comfortable bed. This allows a child to associate reading with comfort and security. The association will continue a lifetime.

Use the Children Books Site's alphabetical list of Dr. Seuss books in print as a guide for parents, grandparents and caregivers to the world of Dr. Seuss. Dr. Seuss classic books, tapes, Audio CD's, CD-ROMs are great birthday, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa and Christmas books for young children. Click to read an online summary of each Dr Seuss juvenile book on the web page. Enjoy the printable list of Dr Seuss titles!




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How the Grinch Stole Christmas by Dr Seuss

How the Grinch Stole Christmas by Dr Seuss
Every Who Down in Whoville Liked Christmas a lot…
But the Grinch, Who lived just north of Whoville, Did NOT!
The Grinch hated Christmas! The whole Christmas season!
Now, please don’t ask why. No one quite knows the reason.
It could be his head wasn’t screwed on just right.
It could be, perhaps, that his shoes were too tight.
But I think that the most likely reason of all,
May have been that his heart was two sizes too small.
Whatever the reason, His heart or his shoes,
He stood there on Christmas Eve, hating the Whos,
Staring down from his cave with a sour, Grinchy frown,
At the warm lighted windows below in their town.
For he knew every Who down in Whoville beneath,
Was busy now, hanging a mistletoe wreath.
“And they’re hanging their stockings!” he snarled with a sneer,
“Tomorrow is Christmas! It’s practically here!”
Then he growled, with his Grinch fingers nervously drumming,
“I MUST find some way to stop Christmas from coming!”
For Tomorrow, he knew, all the Who girls and boys,
Would wake bright and early. They’d rush for their toys!
And then! Oh, the noise! Oh, the Noise!
Noise! Noise! Noise!
That’s one thing he hated! The NOISE!
NOISE! NOISE! NOISE!
Then the Whos, young and old, would sit down to a feast.
And they’d feast! And they’d feast! And they’d FEAST!
FEAST! FEAST! FEAST!
They would feast on Who-pudding, and rare Who-roast beast.
Which was something the Grinch couldn’t stand in the least!
And THEN They’d do something He liked least of all!
Every Who down in Whoville, the tall and the small,
Would stand close together, with Christmas bells ringing.
They’d stand hand-in-hand. And the Whos would start singing!
They’d sing! And they’d sing! And they’d SING!
SING! SING! SING!
And the more the Grinch thought of this Who Christmas Sing,
The more the Grinch thought, “I must stop this whole thing!”
“Why, for fifty-three years I’ve put up with it now!”
“I MUST stop this Christmas from coming! But HOW?”
Then he got an idea! An awful idea!
THE GRINCH GOT A WONDERFUL, AWFUL IDEA!
“I know just what to do!” The Grinch laughed in his throat.
And he made a quick Santy Claus hat and a coat.
And he chuckled, and clucked, “What a great Grinchy trick!”
“With this coat and this hat, I look just like Saint Nick!”
“All I need is a reindeer…” The Grinch looked around.
But, since reindeer are scarce, there was none to be found.
Did that stop the old Grinch? No! The Grinch simply said,
“If I can’t find a reindeer, I’ll make one instead!”
So he called his dog, Max. Then he took some red thread,
And he tied a big horn on the top of his head.
THEN He loaded some bags And some old empty sacks,
On a ramshackle sleigh And he hitched up old Max.
Then the Grinch said, “Giddap!” And the sleigh started down,
Toward the homes where the Whos Lay asnooze in their town.
All their windows were dark. Quiet snow filled the air.
All the Whos were all dreaming sweet dreams without care.
When he came to the first little house on the square.
“This is stop number one,” the old Grinchy Claus hissed,
And he climbed to the roof, empty bags in his fist.
Then he slid down the chimney. A rather tight pinch.
But, if Santa could do it, then so could the Grinch.
He got stuck only once, for a moment or two.
Then he stuck his head out of the fireplace flue.
Where the little Who stockings all hung in a row.
“These stockings,” he grinned, “are the first things to go!”
Then he slithered and slunk, with a smile most unpleasant,
Around the whole room, and he took every present!
Pop guns! And bicycles! Roller skates! Drums!
Checkerboards! Tricycles! Popcorn! And plums!
And he stuffed them in bags. Then the Grinch, very nimbly,
Stuffed all the bags, one by one, up the chimney!
Then he slunk to the icebox. He took the Whos’ feast!
He took the Who-pudding! He took the roast beast!
He cleaned out that icebox as quick as a flash.
Why, that Grinch even took their last can of Who-hash!
Then he stuffed all the food up the chimney with glee.
“And NOW!” grinned the Grinch, “I will stuff up the tree!”
And the Grinch grabbed the tree, and he started to shove,
When he heard a small sound like the coo of a dove.
He turned around fast, and he saw a small Who!
Little Cindy-Lou Who, who was not more than two.
The Grinch had been caught by this tiny Who daughter,
Who’d got out of bed for a cup of cold water.
She stared at the Grinch and said, “Santy Claus, why,”
“Why are you taking our Christmas tree? WHY?”
But, you know, that old Grinch was so smart and so slick,
He thought up a lie, and he thought it up quick!
“Why, my sweet little tot,” the fake Santy Claus lied,
“There’s a light on this tree that won’t light on one side.”
“So I’m taking it home to my workshop, my dear.”
“I’ll fix it up there. Then I’ll bring it back here.”
And his fib fooled the child. Then he patted her head,
And he got her a drink and he sent her to bed.
And when Cindy-Lou Who went to bed with her cup,
HE went to the chimney and stuffed the tree up!
Then the last thing he took Was the log for their fire!
Then he went up the chimney, himself, the old liar.
On their walls he left nothing but hooks and some wire.
And the one speck of food That he left in the house,
Was a crumb that was even too small for a mouse.
Then He did the same thing To the other Whos’ houses
Leaving crumbs Much too small For the other Whos’ mouses!
It was quarter past dawn… All the Whos, still a-bed,
All the Whos, still asnooze When he packed up his sled,
Packed it up with their presents! The ribbons! The wrappings!
The tags! And the tinsel! The trimmings! The trappings!
Three thousand feet up! Up the side of Mt. Crumpit,
He rode with his load to the tiptop to dump it!
“PoohPooh to the Whos!” he was grinchishly humming.
“They’re finding out now that no Christmas is coming!”
“They’re just waking up! I know just what they’ll do!”
“Their mouths will hang open a minute or two,
Then the Whos down in Whoville will all cry BooHoo!”
“That’s a noise,” grinned the Grinch, “That I simply MUST hear!”
So he paused. And the Grinch put his hand to his ear.
And he did hear a sound rising over the snow.
It started in low. Then it started to grow.
But the sound wasn’t sad! Why, this sound sounded merry!
It couldn’t be so! But it WAS merry! VERY!
He stared down at Whoville! The Grinch popped his eyes!
Then he shook! What he saw was a shocking surprise!
Every Who down in Whoville, the tall and the small,
Was singing! Without any presents at all!
He HADN’T stopped Christmas from coming! IT CAME!
Somehow or other, it came just the same!
And the Grinch, with his grinch-feet ice-cold in the snow,
Stood puzzling and puzzling: “How could it be so?”
“It came with out ribbons! It came without tags!”
“It came without packages, boxes or bags!”
And he puzzled three hours, till his puzzler was sore.
Then the Grinch thought of something he hadn’t before!
“Maybe Christmas,” he thought, “doesn’t come from a store.”
“Maybe Christmas…perhaps…means a little bit more!”
And what happened then? Well…in Whoville they say,
That the Grinch’s small heart Grew three sizes that day!
And the minute his heart didn’t feel quite so tight,
He whizzed with his load through the bright morning light,
And he brought back the toys! And the food for the feast!
And he, HE HIMSELF! The Grinch carved the roast beast!

Video:  How the Grinch Stole Christmas


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The Lorax - Dr. Seuss Books

Dr. Seuss is the award-winning and Best-selling American author and illustrator of the story,The Lorax. The classic hardcover book has fifty-six pages. Kids between four and eight-year-old are the target group. The Lorax, like many Dr. Seuss Classic Children Books, is pleasant to all age groups. Besides, The Lorax has a powerful message that everyone on the planet Earth needs to read.

The Lorax begins with a mysterious, old man locked in a tower. At first, he refuses to tell his story. He relents and tells the story of Once-ler. Once-ler finds a beautiful land with tall Truffula trees and green Grickle-Grass. The businessman cuts the Truffula trees and ignores the Jeremiads of the Lorax's warnings. Wreckage replaces the once pristine area, but does Once-ler listen to the Lorax? No! He continues destroying trees to make Thneed, a “Fine thing all people need.”. Soon the air and pond are so polluted all the area's occupants leave. The Lorax are the last to go.

It does not end so sadly. Dr. Seuss gives the reader a ray of hope. On a rock is the single word: UNLESS. Before Once-ler leaves, he gives a small boy the last Truffula tree seed. If this small child realizes, the importance of the seed and nurtures it, there is hope. The mighty forests of Truffula trees with its singing birds and scampering animals will return.

The Lorax is Dr. Seuss’s ecological warning. He wrote it in 1971, but is still an important book today. Today we face global warming. Tree cutting, water and air pollution are major problems. Children need to be aware of the problems facing our earth, their future. The Lorax is one of Dr. Seuss political books.



List of Dr. Seuss Classic Books
And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, 1937
Bartholomew and the Oobleck, 1949
The Butter Battle Book, 1984
Cat in the Hat, 1957
Cat in the Hat Comes Back, 1958
Cat's Quizzer, The
Daisy-Head Mayzie
Did I Ever Tell You How Lucky You Are? 1973
Dr. Seuss ABC, 1963
Dr. Seuss Sleep Book, 1962
The Five Hundred Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins, 1938
The Foot Book, 1968
Fox in Socks, 1965
Great Day for Up! 1974
Green Eggs and Ham, 1960
Happy Birthday to You, 1959
Hop on Pop, 1963
Horton Hatches the Egg, 1940
Horton Hears a Who, 1954
How the Grinch Stole Christmas, 1957
Hunches in Bunches, 1982
I Am Not Going to Get up Today!, 1987
I Can Draw It Myself: By Me, Myself with a Little Help from My Friend Dr. Seuss, 1970
I Can Lick Thirty Tigers Today & Other Stories, 1969
I Can Read with My Eyes Shut!, 1978
I Had Trouble in Getting to Solla Sollew, 1992
If I Ran the Circus, 1956
If I Ran the Zoo, 1950
King's Stilts, 1939
The Lorax, 1971
McElligot's Pool, 1947
Marvin K. Mooney, Will You Please Go Now, 1972
Mister Brown Can Moo, Can You, 1970
My Book About Me, 1969
Oh, Say Can You Say?, 1979
Oh, the Places You'll Go!, 1990
Oh! The Thinks You Can Think!, 1975
On Beyond Zebra, 1955
One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish, 1960
Scrambled Eggs Super!, 1953
The Seven Lady Godivas, 1987
Shape Of Me And Other Stuff, 1973
Sneetches And Other Stories, 1969
There's a Wocket in My Pocket! 1974
Thidwick, the Big-Hearted Moose, 1948
Wet Pet, Dry Pet, Your Pet, My Pet
Yertle the Turtle & Other Stories, 1958
You're Only Old Once



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Horton Hears A Who Dr Seuss

An online summary Horton Hears A Who by Dr. Seuss. The Dr. Seuss Kids' story book has seventy-two pages. It is for children four-years-old and older. The picture book contains Dr. Seuss' zany rhymes and characters.

Horton is the average elephant who lives in an average forest. One day, he comes upon a speck of dust. And, to his amazement, he discovers a world of small creatures. They are Whos. He converses with the mayor of Who-ville. The mayor evokes a promise from Horton. Horton will keep the minuscule community safe and sound. Horton places the speck of dust on a clover.

Unfortunately, the other animals in the forest cannot hear the Whos. The Kangaroo and the others believe Horton is batty. They tie up Horton and steal the Who-ville clover. An eagle flies away with it and drops it in a field of clover.

Horton chases the animals and the soaring eagle. He tracks the eagle day and night. Exhausted, he reaches the field of clover. Horton takes his responsibility seriously and searches millions of clovers until finding the Who-ville clover. Throughout his chase and search, Horton repeats, “A person is a person. No matter how small.”

Again, the kangaroo, monkeys and the other forest animals reach Horton and his clover. They still believe Horton has lost his marbles. The animals threaten to destroy the clover because they do not hear or see this Who-ville.

Horton urges the mayor of Who-ville to have the citizens make a sound so loud the other animals will hear them. The adults and kids of Who-ville must rally together to make this sound and save themselves. The citizens rally and create quite a ruckus. Yet, the forest animals hear not a squeak. The mayor of Who-ville races about town urging the people to make any sound. He discovers a little Who who is not participating. The little Who with encouragement joins the shouting and the forest animals hear the citizens of Who-ville. Who-ville is saved!

Dr. Seuss’s Horton Hears A Who is more than a children's picture book. It a philosophical work of art. Dr. Seuss covers many issues. First, a person must be responsible and keep one’s promise. Secondly, no matter how small one is in this big world, she is important. Thirdly, there comes a time one must do something to help oneself. And last of all, every citizen in a community is important for the town’s well-being.

Children will identify with the citizens of Who-ville. They feel so small in this big world. At times, adults don’t hear them and disregard their feelings. Horton reminds them there are others who will listen and protect them.

Horton Hears A Who has the classic Dr. Seuss rhyming verse. The rhythm is unlike the simple pattern in the Cat in the Hat or Green Eggs and Ham. It is more in the style of King’s Stilts. The text is like a typical story. At seventy-two pages, it is twice as long as the Dr. Suess beginner books. Although, the book is for children between four and eight-years-old these juveniles might not be able to read the picture book themselves until the age of seven and older. Parents and teachers take another look at Horton Hears A Who, it is more than a child’s picture book.


List of Dr. Seuss Classic Books
And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, 1937
Bartholomew and the Oobleck, 1949
The Butter Battle Book, 1984
Cat in the Hat, 1957
Cat in the Hat Comes Back, 1958
Cat's Quizzer, The
Daisy-Head Mayzie
Did I Ever Tell You How Lucky You Are? 1973
Dr. Seuss ABC, 1963
Dr. Seuss Sleep Book, 1962
The Five Hundred Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins, 1938
The Foot Book, 1968
Fox in Socks, 1965
Great Day for Up! 1974
Green Eggs and Ham, 1960
Happy Birthday to You, 1959
Hop on Pop, 1963
Horton Hatches the Egg, 1940
Horton Hears a Who, 1954
How the Grinch Stole Christmas, 1957
Hunches in Bunches, 1982
I Am Not Going to Get up Today!, 1987
I Can Draw It Myself: By Me, Myself with a Little Help from My Friend Dr. Seuss, 1970
I Can Lick Thirty Tigers Today & Other Stories, 1969
I Can Read with My Eyes Shut!, 1978
I Had Trouble in Getting to Solla Sollew, 1992
If I Ran the Circus, 1956
If I Ran the Zoo, 1950
King's Stilts, 1939
The Lorax, 1971
McElligot's Pool, 1947
Marvin K. Mooney, Will You Please Go Now, 1972
Mister Brown Can Moo, Can You, 1970
My Book About Me, 1969
Oh, Say Can You Say?, 1979
Oh, the Places You'll Go!, 1990
Oh! The Thinks You Can Think!, 1975
On Beyond Zebra, 1955
One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish, 1960
Scrambled Eggs Super!, 1953
The Seven Lady Godivas, 1987
Shape Of Me And Other Stuff, 1973
Sneetches And Other Stories, 1969
There's a Wocket in My Pocket! 1974
Thidwick, the Big-Hearted Moose, 1948
Wet Pet, Dry Pet, Your Pet, My Pet
Yertle the Turtle & Other Stories, 1958
You're Only Old Once



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Horton Hatches the Egg - Dr Seuss

Dr. Seuss teaches kids responsibility in Horton Hatches the Egg(Classic Seuss Hardcover). The picture book has sixty-four pages. It is for children between four and eight-years-old(ages 4-8). Dr. Seuss read-aloud book in rhyme contains his trademark whimsical characters.

Horton is an elephant. A loving, faithful elephant. Mayzie is a bird, a lazy bird hatching an egg. Lazy Mayzie asks Horton to sit on her egg, saying she will return soon. Horton agrees. Mayzie does not return. She chooses to stay in Palm Beach. Horton, takes his responsibility seriously, remains with the egg.

Dr. Seuss sketches of a large Horton sitting on the tiny egg cause kids to giggle. Children know how fragile is an egg. They know how heavy is an elephant. In addition, kids understand how absurd hatching an egg is for an elephant. Children will admire Horton’s determination to remain on the job and protect the egg despite the other animals’ taunts.

Horton Hatches the Egg has two morals. The first moral is to be responsible. The second is to take pride in one's work. They are important character building lessons for children to learn early in life. Right now, preschool and kindergarten children have two responsibilities: school and household chores. Later, responsibilities are much more major: work and family.

Share Dr. Seuss’s Horton Hatches the Egg with infants, toddlers and early elementary children. Introduce them to Dr. Seuss’s rhyming verse and zany characters. Open a discussion with them about the actions of Horton and Mayzie. Hard work and patience bring great rewards.

Dr. Seuss wrote Horton Hatches the Egg in 1940. His illustrations are not in full color. The illustrations are pen and ink drawings with red and green watercolors. Horton is also in Horton Hears a Who! It is another delightful Dr. Seuss picture book. Horton’s sense of responsibility saves the small community: Who-ville. The citizens of Who-ville return in a later juvenile Classic Dr. Seuss Hardcover, How the Grinch Stole Christmas.

In Hooray for Diffendoofer Day, Dr. Seuss shares his views on education in the United States of America in his characteristc manner.


List of Dr. Seuss Classic Books
And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, 1937
Bartholomew and the Oobleck, 1949
The Butter Battle Book, 1984
Cat in the Hat, 1957
Cat in the Hat Comes Back, 1958
Cat's Quizzer, The
Daisy-Head Mayzie
Did I Ever Tell You How Lucky You Are? 1973
Dr. Seuss ABC, 1963
Dr. Seuss Sleep Book, 1962
The Five Hundred Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins, 1938
The Foot Book, 1968
Fox in Socks, 1965
Great Day for Up! 1974
Green Eggs and Ham, 1960
Happy Birthday to You, 1959
Hop on Pop, 1963
Horton Hatches the Egg, 1940
Horton Hears a Who, 1954
How the Grinch Stole Christmas, 1957
Hunches in Bunches, 1982
I Am Not Going to Get up Today!, 1987
I Can Draw It Myself: By Me, Myself with a Little Help from My Friend Dr. Seuss, 1970
I Can Lick Thirty Tigers Today & Other Stories, 1969
I Can Read with My Eyes Shut!, 1978
I Had Trouble in Getting to Solla Sollew, 1992
If I Ran the Circus, 1956
If I Ran the Zoo, 1950
King's Stilts, 1939
The Lorax, 1971
McElligot's Pool, 1947
Marvin K. Mooney, Will You Please Go Now, 1972
Mister Brown Can Moo, Can You, 1970
My Book About Me, 1969
Oh, Say Can You Say?, 1979
Oh, the Places You'll Go!, 1990
Oh! The Thinks You Can Think!, 1975
On Beyond Zebra, 1955
One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish, 1960
Scrambled Eggs Super!, 1953
The Seven Lady Godivas, 1987
Shape Of Me And Other Stuff, 1973
Sneetches And Other Stories, 1969
There's a Wocket in My Pocket! 1974
Thidwick, the Big-Hearted Moose, 1948
Wet Pet, Dry Pet, Your Pet, My Pet
Yertle the Turtle & Other Stories, 1958
You're Only Old Once


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Happy Birthday to You!

A Birthday is the time to celebrate.
This is Dr. Seuss’s message in Happy Birthday to You!
It is not a day to under rate.
For if there are no you,
What will we,
The people of Katroo and Bellaonline Children’s Books Site, do?

Your birthday is yours,
Cakes, gifts, feasts, and good times Birthday Bird pour.
Why? It is your birthday!
Let’s celebrate your birth, your creation.
Why? You are you.
You are unique and worth the ink.
We give you a wink!

Now read this web link in a blink,
Share this online summary with Karen, Natasha and Mary.
Now don’t forget the guys,
The Bobs, Jamels and Clydes.
They need birthday high-fives.

Happy Birthday to You!
Dr. Seuss, Katroo and the Bellaonline Children’s Books Site are root-toot for you.

If you are strapped for cash,
Don’t let it place a finish on your bash.
Fly with the Birthday Bird to the local library,
Don’t leave Perry and Mary.
Be merry with the book stash.

Dr. Seuss Happy Birthday to You!
A delight for children between four and eight.
However, never blow out the light on the ones
In the stages between ages one and hundred plus ones.
The Dr. Seuss picture book has seventy-two pages,
Still, it is for all day-zes.
Remember Dr. Seuss wrote of Katroo!
Why? Because you, he and I are unique, too!

Children need to have a regular routine. A set bedtime and place to sleep are part of the daily routine. Read a bedtime story as part of the nightly ritual. Read quiet, soothing books to children in their warm, comfortable bed. This allows a child to associate reading with comfort and security. The association will continue a lifetime.

Use the Children Books Site's alphabetical list of Dr. Seuss Classic books in print as a guide for parents, grandparents and caregivers to the world of Dr. Seuss. Dr. Seuss classic books, tapes, Audio CD's, CD-ROMs are great birthday, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa and Christmas books for young children. Click to read an online summary of each Dr Seuss juvenile book on the web page. Enjoy the printable list of Dr Seuss titles!


List of Dr. Seuss Classic Books
And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, 1937
Bartholomew and the Oobleck, 1949
The Butter Battle Book, 1984
Cat in the Hat, 1957
Cat in the Hat Comes Back, 1958
Cat's Quizzer, The
Daisy-Head Mayzie
Did I Ever Tell You How Lucky You Are? 1973
Dr. Seuss ABC, 1963
Dr. Seuss Sleep Book, 1962
The Five Hundred Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins, 1938
The Foot Book, 1968
Fox in Socks, 1965
Great Day for Up! 1974
Green Eggs and Ham, 1960
Happy Birthday to You, 1959
Hop on Pop, 1963
Horton Hatches the Egg, 1940
Horton Hears a Who, 1954
How the Grinch Stole Christmas, 1957
Hunches in Bunches, 1982
I Am Not Going to Get up Today!, 1987
I Can Draw It Myself: By Me, Myself with a Little Help from My Friend Dr. Seuss, 1970
I Can Lick Thirty Tigers Today & Other Stories, 1969
I Can Read with My Eyes Shut!, 1978
I Had Trouble in Getting to Solla Sollew, 1992
If I Ran the Circus, 1956
If I Ran the Zoo, 1950
King's Stilts, 1939
The Lorax, 1971
McElligot's Pool, 1947
Marvin K. Mooney, Will You Please Go Now, 1972
Mister Brown Can Moo, Can You, 1970
My Book About Me, 1969
Oh, Say Can You Say?, 1979
Oh, the Places You'll Go!, 1990
Oh! The Thinks You Can Think!, 1975
On Beyond Zebra, 1955
One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish, 1960
Scrambled Eggs Super!, 1953
The Seven Lady Godivas, 1987
Shape Of Me And Other Stuff, 1973
Sneetches And Other Stories, 1969
There's a Wocket in My Pocket! 1974
Thidwick, the Big-Hearted Moose, 1948
Wet Pet, Dry Pet, Your Pet, My Pet
Yertle the Turtle & Other Stories, 1958
You're Only Old Once



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Green Eggs and Ham - Dr. Seuss

Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss is a delightful book to teach children to try new foods. Dr. Seuss teaches kids this important life lesson in a picture book. The board book’s rhymes and whimsical characters are a wonderful way to capture the infant and toddler attention.

Little children are picky eaters. It is a chore to introduce new foods to them. Vegetables and fruits are the hardest to add to their diet. It is important for kids to eat vegetables and fruits instead of snacks.

In Green Eggs and Ham, Sam-I-am asks, “Do you like green eggs and ham?” The character, No-Name, replies, “I do not like green eggs and ham.” No-Name, like a child, puts his nose and hand in the air to ward off the foods. He defiantly refuses to eat the new foods.

Sam-I-am tries to entice the picky eater to try the new foods. He uses rhyming situations to get the stubborn No-Name to eat a tiny bite. Would No-Name try them in the rain on a train? Would he try them in a box with a fox? Would he try them with a mouse in a house?

Dr. Seuss gives a life lesson to parents trying to introduce new foods to young children, also. Just keep trying! Sam-I-am does not quit. He keeps trying. No-Name tries finally the green eggs and ham. Guess what happens? No-Name likes the food.

He will eat it in the rain on a train. No-Name will eat the food in a box with a fox. He is willing to eat the food with a mouse in a house.

Green Eggs and Ham works on two levels. Children should try the healthy foods offered by parents. Parents should not quit offering new foods to children. A note to parents who are afraid of this method, Sam-I-am and No-name end the book the best of friends.



List of Dr. Seuss Classic Books
And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, 1937
Bartholomew and the Oobleck, 1949
The Butter Battle Book, 1984
Cat in the Hat, 1957
Cat in the Hat Comes Back, 1958
Cat's Quizzer, The
Daisy-Head Mayzie
Did I Ever Tell You How Lucky You Are? 1973
Dr. Seuss ABC, 1963
Dr. Seuss Sleep Book, 1962
The Five Hundred Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins, 1938
The Foot Book, 1968
Fox in Socks, 1965
Great Day for Up! 1974
Green Eggs and Ham, 1960
Happy Birthday to You, 1959
Hop on Pop, 1963
Horton Hatches the Egg, 1940
Horton Hears a Who, 1954
How the Grinch Stole Christmas, 1957
Hunches in Bunches, 1982
I Am Not Going to Get up Today!, 1987
I Can Draw It Myself: By Me, Myself with a Little Help from My Friend Dr. Seuss, 1970
I Can Lick Thirty Tigers Today & Other Stories, 1969
I Can Read with My Eyes Shut!, 1978
I Had Trouble in Getting to Solla Sollew, 1992
If I Ran the Circus, 1956
If I Ran the Zoo, 1950
King's Stilts, 1939
The Lorax, 1971
McElligot's Pool, 1947
Marvin K. Mooney, Will You Please Go Now, 1972
Mister Brown Can Moo, Can You, 1970
My Book About Me, 1969
Oh, Say Can You Say?, 1979
Oh, the Places You'll Go!, 1990
Oh! The Thinks You Can Think!, 1975
On Beyond Zebra, 1955
One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish, 1960
Scrambled Eggs Super!, 1953
The Seven Lady Godivas, 1987
Shape Of Me And Other Stuff, 1973
Sneetches And Other Stories, 1969
There's a Wocket in My Pocket! 1974
Thidwick, the Big-Hearted Moose, 1948
Wet Pet, Dry Pet, Your Pet, My Pet
Yertle the Turtle & Other Stories, 1958
You're Only Old Once



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